Is Ministry of Education falls under HRD Ministry

Basic decree on reading education

Business number: BMUKK-29.540 / 0028-I / 1/2012
Clerk: MinRätin Maga. Maria Dippelreiter
Department: I / 1
[email protected]
T +43 1 53120-2850
F +43 1 53120-812850

Distribution: Provincial school councils / city school council for Vienna, directorates of the central teaching institutions, rectorates of the universities of teacher education, directorates of the practice schools of the universities of teacher education
Subject: Principles of instruction
Content: Reading education
Validity: unlimited

Circular No. 11/2013

State school councils /
City School Council for Vienna
Rectorates of the
Pedagogical colleges
Directorates of the central teaching institutions
Directorates of the practical schools of
Pedagogical colleges

Basic decree on reading education

preamble

Teaching principles contribute to the realization of those educational and upbringing tasks that are not assigned to a subject or a few subjects, but which become effective across subjects in the interaction of many or all subjects. The implementation of the teaching principles requires a coordination of the individual subjects using many cross-connections.

The educational mandate of the Austrian school is to give particular importance to the teaching of reading in all subjects in all school types and at all school levels in connection with the other teaching principles. In this context, reading means the understanding processing of texts in which writing appears alone or in connection with multimodal elements (image, logo, sounds, film, etc.). Reading promotes the acquisition and use of language in its function as a medium for thinking, exchanging information and building relationships.

Reading education as the mediation of text reception and text production is an integral part of primary school and an essential part of comprehensive language training. It is a central educational and teaching task for the subject of German; In addition, it is laid down as a teaching principle in all types of schools, all school levels and subjects, and in the curricula.

After acquiring the basic reading skills, reading skills must also be acquired and further developed on a domain-specific basis (in German lessons) or subject-specific (in all subjects). Reading education supports the learning and development process, which must be continuously accompanied both on the level of reading motivation and on the level of reading competence. Reading education considerations are an integral part of developing teaching content.

Reading is one of the essential areas of competence in educational standards. The OECD-PISA study defines reading as “the basic competence for a satisfying personal, professional and social life as well as for an active participation in social life”. Reading competence enables students to understand texts of various kinds in terms of their statements, their intentions and their formal structure, to classify them in a larger meaningful context and to be able to use texts appropriately and purposefully for various purposes to produce.

1. Tasks of teaching reading

Education in reading affects all subjects taught; it supports the learning and development process. Reading skills must be acquired in a differentiated manner according to the individual requirements of the students (e.g. consideration of sociocultural and everyday life heterogeneity, multilingualism and interculturality). The diagnostic work-up must be followed by the development of the necessary support measures. Reading skills develop in stages, but these are mutually dependent and cannot be taught in isolation.

The following competencies can be distinguished:

  • Basic reading competence (word and sentence level) as the ability to read at word and sentence level
    • safe, accurate and fluent to read and
    • make simple links.
  • Cognitive reading literacy as the ability to
    • Reading texts with different lengths, complexity and different content in a meaningful and meaningful way
    • to learn from texts and to acquire knowledge.
  • Motivational competence as the ability and willingness to
    • to make suitable texts available independently and
    • to deal with reading material cognitively and emotionally and to get involved.
  • Reflexive competence as the ability to deal critically and / or creatively with texts and to comment on, evaluate, assess, process and compare them.
  • Communicative competence as the ability and willingness to exchange information with other people about what has been read and with the help of texts.

2. Criteria for implementing reading promotion measures

  • create a positive reading culture and atmosphere within the class and at school,
  • Develop and implement location-specific reading programs with joint coordination of all activities and didactic measures,
  • include the students' social environment (e.g. family literacy),
  • differentiate according to socio-cultural as well as age- and development-specific requirements,
  • consider and promote individual, e.g. gender-specific, reading interests,
  • Awareness and practice of reading strategies,
  • work creatively with texts and transfer them to other media or forms of expression (e.g. music, visual arts, performing arts),
  • Use age-appropriate media for children and young people and lead to sophisticated literature,
  • critically and selectively receive analog and digital media,
  • integrate the multimedia school library into everyday teaching (e.g. reading, research and research),
  • Recognize reading problems at an early stage, develop and apply individual support strategies and
  • collaborate with reading and literature institutions, public and academic libraries and other network partners.

3. Components of the decree

The basic decree consists of the preamble and a description of the tasks of reading education and the criteria for implementing reading promotion measures, as well as the explanations.

4. Application of the decree

The implementation of this decree in schools must be worked out and prepared in pedagogical conferences. The provincial school councils / the city school council for Vienna, the rectorates of the universities of teacher education as well as the practical schools and the directorates of the central teaching institutions are informed of this and requested to make appropriate announcements in their sphere of activity. Wherever there is talk of teachers, this also applies in the context of school day care and also for the educators employed there.

In order to fulfill the tasks mentioned in the decree, the teachers must work together with supporting experts from the colleges of education, universities and relevant extracurricular institutions, (school) libraries, etc.

The inclusion of the contents and objectives of the basic decree in the training, further education and further training concepts of the colleges of education and universities as well as the educational institutions for kindergarten pedagogy and the educational institutions for social pedagogy is a central contribution to improving the reading skills of the pupils.

For all pedagogues, the appropriate skills and attitudes must be developed in their training, further education and training, which enable them to take effective measures to promote reading (see illustration in the explanations).

It is explicitly pointed out that the present decree is closely related to other relevant edicts for pedagogical matters (e.g. information on mother tongue teaching, general decree on media education, textbook decree, book club decree, general decree on the promotion of gifted children, fundamental decree "Holistic-creative learning culture in the schools ", guidelines for the application of support plans, guidelines for differentiation and control measures in connection with the determination of special educational needs, school libraries, strengthening of reading skills in secondary schools, performance assessment in the case of reading and spelling weaknesses or dyslexia) in their respective applicable form realize is.

The decree is published in the Ministerialverordnungsblatt.

Explanations of the "Basic decree on the teaching principle of reading education"

In 1999, GZ 29.540 / 0004-V / 3c / 1999 was last published on March 25, 1999 by the Federal Ministry for Education, Art and Culture, the basic decree on reading education, which is a teaching principle.

Due to the dynamic of the changes of the last 13 years, especially caused by the development of the new media, the revision of the basic decree has been organized as a broad, participatory process: experts from all areas of the Federal Ministry for Education, Art and Culture and the group of external experts were informed about the comprehensive project and contributed their technical expertise (in the form of revision proposals).

Specific feedback (listed in alphabetical order) was provided by:

Prof. Mag. Dr. Margit Böck, University of Klagenfurt
MR Mag. Maria Dippelreiter, BMUKK, Dept. I / 1
Dr. Reinhard Ehgartner, Salzburg Library
Mag. Gerhard Falschlehner, youth book club
MR Mag. Elfie Fleck, BMUKK, Ref. I / 5a
ADir. RgR Christine Grafinger, BMUKK, Dept. I / 7
Mag. Sigrid Jones, M.A., University of Vienna
SCStV MR Mag.Augustin Kern, BMUKK, Section I.
MR Mag. Doris Kölbl-Tschulik, BMUKK, coordination of art and cultural education projects
MR Dr. Gerhard Krötzl, BMUKK, Dept. I / 9
Doris Kurtagic-Heindl, M.A., University of Education Vienna 10
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Gunther Kress, University of London
SC Kurt Nekula, M.A., BMUKK, Section I.
Dipl.-Päd. Saskia Rahel Nüßle, University of Education Vienna 10
Mag. Dominika Raditsch, BMUKK, Ref. I / 5c
Mag. Werner Schöggl, Burgenland University of Education
HR Mag. Erich Svecnik, BIFIE
Sarah Steiner (intern at the BMUKK, Dept. I / 1, editorial assistance)
MR Mag. Helmut Stemmer, ICT Coordination Office
ADir. Robert Stocker, BMUKK, Dept. I / 1 (editorial assistance)
Univ.-Prof. Mag. Dr. Christian Swertz, University of Vienna
Dr. Muriel Warga-Fallenböck, BMUKK, Ref .I / 5b and
MMag. Brigitte Winkler-Komar, BMUKK, Dept. V / 3.

All contributions have been editorially incorporated according to their content or their statement. The explanatory text for the decree is intended to enable an in-depth examination of the individual statements. Reference is made once again to the fact that both parts of the text (enactment and explanation) belong together.

Explanations of the individual statements (in the order according to the decree)

Education in reading should be given particular importance in all subjects in all types of schools and at all school levels in connection with the other teaching principles:

Reading education aims at reading and producing texts as a universal cultural tool and a prerequisite for knowledge acquisition and learning success in all subjects.

This means that teachers should

  • promote the joy of reading and dealing with literary and non-literary texts,
  • To convey reading as a self-determined, lifelong activity, which is one of the prerequisites for social participation - both in the form of factual or information-oriented as well as literary reading,
  • intensify cooperation with school libraries and public libraries as well as other institutions in which writing has a high priority,
  • teach a competent handling of texts of all kinds including analog and digital information and communication technologies,
  • support the ability and willingness to choose texts independently,
  • contribute to the development of a school writing and reading culture in all subjects as an important contribution to school quality and
  • Anchoring reading independently of gender-typical and social (class-specific and cultural) classifications as a contribution to personal development and lifelong learning (LLL).

Reading education makes an important contribution to personal development and the choice of school or career by opening up access to alternative reading attitudes, content and specialist cultures.

Reading education means practicing how to deal with a variety of texts competently. These texts differ in terms of language, form, structure, function, type of text and carrier medium.

Reading education also means introducing people to the competent handling of multimodal texts. These texts combine language, images, sound and movement, analog and digital technologies in different ways.

Reading is the understanding processing of texts:

In the following, reading means both the understanding processing of written texts as well as multimodal sign systems (according to Prof. Gunther Kress) in which writing occurs in connection with visual, acoustic, tactile or olfactory modes: visual modes would be e.g. traffic signs, acoustic modes of signations Shipments, tactile modes of Braille on drug packaging and olfactory modes of "baking smell" in the grocery department. In all cases, the aim is to capture and understand texts and such sign systems, to use them in a targeted manner, to reflect on their creation and to verify statements. Texts distributed electronically, e.g. on the Internet, which is also a predominantly written medium, pose further challenges for teachers and students:

These texts not only have to be recorded and understood in order to be able to use them purposefully, but they also have to be critically questioned and the statements verified - even more so than conventional printed texts - with regard to their origin, their relevance and their intentions.
Reading enables learners to select and process information and complex content in a selective and targeted manner, promotes self-determined and self-confident as well as critical, questioning approach to and handling of information and communication media and is indispensable for many practical and professional tasks.

Text reception must be seen in close connection with text production, which can be understood through the expanded possibilities of the virtual space (e.g. development of a sequel story by a group of authors or through permanent feedback from the readership in the production process itself).

Reading is a constructive activity, an active process. It is only through the act of reading by the reader that meaning arises; each text allows different readings. Reading and media experiences shape the idea of ​​reality. Reading competence therefore also means to understand different readings and to be able to accept other readings and ideas of reality. Readers shape the meaning of a text through their socially and culturally determined individual reading on the basis of their life experiences and thus their subjective worldview and actively train their imagination and creativity.
The ability to read complex texts (e.g. fictional literature, but also laws, contracts, etc.) actively and creatively is the prerequisite for being able to act in a larger framework or context, to develop and handle life plans and personal projects.

Reading makes content, topics, sciences and professional fields accessible to children and young people through factual texts and non-fiction. Domain-specific reading opens up a variety of text types, genres and media forms of appearance, which can contribute to broadening interests and perspectives for choosing a course of study and career. In this way, subject-oriented reading in particular makes an important contribution to the choice of school type before making important school career decisions (4th, 6th, 8th grade). In particular, the expansion of the areas of interest that are often determined by gender (e.g. in the natural sciences) can be supported by getting to know these areas through suitable texts.

Reading skills are basic skills ...:

Reading competence relates to analogue and digital information and communication technologies and speech training, written language acquisition and the extensive area of ​​literacy, especially for learners in an increasingly digital society and diversity of information conveyance. Reading competence is a prerequisite for developing one's own potential and participating in social, cultural and economic life.

It describes the ability to read both written and multimodally represented texts

  • to understand in their prospects, intentions and their formal structure,
  • to be placed in a larger meaningful context,
  • to use appropriately and purposefully for various purposes,
  • to critically question their origins, to reflect on them and to produce and reproduce them.

Reading competence enables texts to be used and produced appropriately and in a targeted manner for various purposes. Readers actively shape the meaning of a text through their socially and culturally determined individual reading on the basis of their life experiences and thus their subjective worldview. Reading as dealing with texts and media is also one of the essential areas of competence in educational standards. Reading education aims at reading competence as a universal cultural tool, as a prerequisite for knowledge acquisition, learning success in all subjects and for lifelong educational processes.

Reading enables the learner to selectively and specifically select and process, as well as practical and professional application of information and complex content, it promotes self-determined, self-confident and critical, questioning approach to and handling of information and communication media.

Teaching reading supports the learning and development process:

Education in reading means introducing people to the competent handling of a variety of texts, which differ in terms of language, form, structure, function, text type and carrier medium, as well as the competent handling of multimodal texts, which language, image, sound and movement, analog and digital Linking technologies in different ways.

Reading is therefore of central importance for individual development in the cognitive, emotional, social, creative and pragmatic areas and creates the basis for self-determined and self-organized thinking, evaluating and acting.

Reading supports the ability to imagine as an opportunity to take different perspectives and to develop empathy and creativity. Reading supports (self-) educational processes, strengthens self-confidence and thus makes a contribution to personality development (for example by confronting the I with the we, through demarcation and identification).

Reading competence develops over levels ...:

Reading competence, which can vary depending on previous knowledge, subject matter, language, and preferences, develops in stages. It is a prerequisite for learning, for research, for the production and reproduction of texts.

The following competencies can be distinguished:

Basic reading skills (at word and sentence level)

This term describes the ability to read safely, accurately and fluently at word and sentence level and to make simple connections.

Basic or simple reading skills are understood to be literacy as a cultural technique that turns the non-reader into a reader. This must be differentiated according to the individual requirements and needs of the students.

Regular (self-) monitoring of reading skills is necessary to improve reading skills. The results of these reviews form the basis for choosing appropriate funding measures.

Cognitive reading skills

Reading makes content, topics, sciences and professional fields accessible to children and young people through factual texts and non-fiction. Domain-specific reading opens up a variety of text types, genres and media forms of appearance, which can contribute to broadening interests and perspectives for choosing a course of study and career. In this way, subject-oriented reading in particular makes an important contribution to the choice of school type before making important school career decisions (4th, 6th, 8th grade). In particular, the expansion of the areas of interest that are often determined by gender (e.g. in the natural sciences) can be supported by getting to know these areas through suitable texts.
It is the ability

  • To read texts of different lengths, complexity and different content in a meaningful and meaningful way
  • to learn from texts and to acquire knowledge.

Motivational competence

is the ability

  • to make suitable texts available independently and
  • to deal with reading material cognitively and emotionally and to get involved.

Reading creates freedom, it can relieve the pressure of everyday life, it promotes the ability to criticize, judge, reflect and make decisions and it contributes to the development of personal and cultural identity: Reading conveys relaxation and enjoyment and thus makes an important contribution to personal development; It supports the development of personal, social and technical skills, trains the ability to think, express, communicate and act, develop cultural assets and knowledge and promote networked thinking.

The central concern is to arouse the willingness and joy of reading in the pupils and to convey lifelong reading. For this purpose, it is necessary in the classroom to design and promote reading in a way that motivates, gender and compensates for reading, particularly through the use of text, reading methods and framework conditions.

Taking into account individual access to reading, also in connection with culture-related, gender-specific, socio-economic, age-specific and development-specific, appropriate offers are to be made to the students.

Reflexive competence

is the ability to critically and / or creatively deal with texts and to comment on, evaluate, assess, process and compare them. Reading competence in the sense of "reading literacy" is defined as the "ability to understand, use and reflect on written text material in order to achieve one's own goals, develop one's own knowledge and potential and participate in social life" (http: // www .oecd.org /dataoecd/36/56/35693281.pdf, p. 18 [date of access: 10/22/2012]). Reading competence also means being able to critically question and evaluate texts with regard to their creation, their credibility and the intentions of their producers.

communicative competence

is the ability and willingness to exchange information with other people about what has been read and with the help of texts. Reading enables a dialogue across temporal and spatial distances and opens up traditional cultural assets and knowledge. It trains the ability to think, express, communicate and act. Reading is always embedded in concrete social and cultural practices and enables active participation in public discourses with old and new media and thus in social, cultural and economic processes.
Reading is a dialogical act and enables follow-up communication across temporal, spatial, cultural and social distances. Both active and passive (using) participation in public discussion forums or in collaborative projects such as Wikipedia development is an essential component of participation in our society.

A positive reading culture / reading atmosphere can be created through ...:

  • a differentiated range of texts with regard to the text type and function (factual texts, fictional texts, entertainment, tension, relaxation, information, etc.),
  • the multimodality of access (text and image media, reading games, audio media, audiovisual media, interactive media, websites, weblogs),
  • Consideration and promotion of the social environment of the readers and their personal reading interests and reading habits, taking into account reading biographical methods (consideration of socio-cultural and everyday life heterogeneity, multilingualism and interculturality),
  • an open, creative and constructive approach to texts and media,
  • Reading as a social event (reading aloud, reading theater, reading partnerships, author readings, book exhibitions, swap fairs, children's radio, regular free reading times in class, etc.),
  • the mediation of orientation, search and selection strategies for texts and text carriers (use of libraries and libraries, bookshops, book exhibitions, catalogs or their virtual expressions on the Internet such as Internet search engines and relevant, child-friendly Internet platforms,
  • Independent or guided information search (e.g. for the design of written work or presentations) on the World Wide Web / Internet,
  • Processing of experiences in dealing with information selection and information acquisition,
  • an offer of such content, topics and such media that maintain or stimulate reading motivation in the sensitive phases of the reading crisis,
  • the consideration of the languages ​​of origin,
  • the consideration of prerequisites and conditions in family, peer group and society (e.g. non-scripted / close-to-script socialization),
  • the possibility of self-directed search for further supplementary texts that can either confirm or refute information that is already available in the sense of critical handling,
  • Impulses for a broad exchange of reading experiences in conversations, discussions or forums,
  • the exchange of personal recommendations between adults, children and adolescents and between peers,
  • follow-up communication (literary conversation, reflection on one's own reading biography, etc.),
  • the creation of your own text collections (mini-books, magazines, audio books and book collections, class library, digital text collections, bookmarks in the web browser),
  • Reading, sharing and collecting stories, books, letters, comics, weblogs that have been written and designed by students for students,
  • Changing organizational forms of reading: reading aloud by the teacher, silent reading, reading sponsorships or reading partnerships, reading in groups,
  • Audio recordings and reflection of your own voice, reading games, reading on digital media, interactive reading, reading hypertexts, reading aloud only with appropriate preparation, etc.,
  • Appropriate time frame: individual reading speed, regular reading times, free reading times, reading hours, reading hours, book days, reading weeks, etc.,
  • Suitable spatial framework conditions: individual reading places, reading corner, reading tent, lighting, etc.,
  • Freedom of choice of text; Allowing and stimulating spontaneous reactions,
  • Support and appreciation of the interests of the students,
  • Reading with the support of new forms of the book and the media embedded therein and
  • Integration of the mobile phone and other digital media as reading and writing media.

Develop and implement location-specific reading programs with joint coordination of all activities and didactic measures ...:

Have proven to be particularly suitable

  • the use of the tools for determining language proficiency for children with German as their first language or with German as a second language as the basis for targeted support in the elementary sector,
  • the extension of reading time within the classroom,
  • Individual measures that facilitate learning to read, such as exercises in phonological awareness, vocal gestures, awareness of analogies, increasing reading speed, lessons in reading comprehension, vocabulary expansion, strategic reading,
  • the development of a concept for elementary education on the basis of the educational framework plan for elementary educational institutions in Austria (August 2009) and the part of the educational plan for language support in elementary educational institutions (June 2009),
  • the development of a school reading framework,
  • well-structured reading lessons using promising teaching strategies,
  • Active involvement of those responsible for upbringing and suggestions for a reading-conducive climate in the family and in the private environment of the students,
  • Promotion of reading-stimulating framework conditions ("reading school", multi-reading process, etc.) in all subjects,
  • the implementation of school-specific reading events and sustainable reading initiatives, e.g. encounters and workshops with authors (also in languages ​​other than German), translators and illustrators,
  • the implementation of cross-school reading and literature projects,
  • Book exhibitions, book presentations, collaboration with booksellers, with the media, etc.,
  • participation in regional and national literary, reading and cultural initiatives
  • the suggestion or promotion of literary clubs, school newspapers etc. as well as
  • effective media presentation of these activities in the form of publications, online or on video.

Differentiate according to socio-cultural as well as age- and development-specific requirements ...:

The pupil is at the center of reading education and promotion. Reading supports the experience and development of one's own personality. Differentiating reading lessons take into account all facets of learning to read with the help of strategies for text indexing.
This presupposes a differentiated approach to the personal reading biography, the interest, the reading ability of the pupil, gender differences, multilingualism, sociocultural and everyday contexts, both in the choice of reading material and the methods.
A differentiated approach to the interests, reading ability and reading skills of the student and their personal reading biography requires the teachers to have a broad knowledge of adequate reading options, access options and ways of using them.

Consider and promote individual, e.g. gender-specific, reading interests:

Reading skills must be acquired in a differentiated manner according to the individual requirements and needs (e.g. inclusion) of the students (e.g. consideration of socio-cultural and everyday life heterogeneity, multilingualism and interculturality). In the case of severe reading weaknesses, experts should be consulted (e.g. special teachers for reading and writing weaknesses as well as for reading and writing, school psychologists, for multilingual children DaZ teachers and native speaker teachers).
The learning requirements of schoolchildren whose family language is not identical to the educational language German must be taken into account - especially in the first years of learning and in the course of literacy in German. While children with German as their first language can generally build on age-appropriate oral language competence in German when they acquire the written language, learners with other first languages ​​have to acquire the cultural techniques of reading and writing in the second language, which is usually the weaker language. It is therefore advisable to start the literacy process only when the child has reasonably confident communicative skills in the German language.
If the composition of the class allows it and appropriate teachers are available, literacy including the first language or bilingual literacy is recommended. In any case, it is helpful to deal with the peculiarities of the German language and at least to some extent with some peculiarities of the first languages ​​represented in the class (phonology, morphosyntax) (see language profiles, currently available in 20 languages).

Schoolchildren should learn to make an individual choice of text. This is promoted through free reading (free choice of text), group reading and topic-related reading (choice from a list, etc.).
Schoolchildren should learn to select texts individually and must be given adequate support. This is promoted through free reading (free choice of text), group reading and topic-related choices (reading on a specific topic, reading on a specific type of text or a literary genre).
Pupils with a first language other than German should be encouraged to read texts in their native language.

The multilingualism of pupils should be taken up and used as a resource in order to develop interest and sensitivity for different languages ​​and for language itself in all pupils.
Gender-typical preferences and reading modes require, on the one hand, a corresponding differentiation in the text offer or in the task definition, on the other hand, work should gradually be carried out on expanding reading attitudes beyond existing gender stereotypes.

Awareness of reading strategies and practice ...:

In elementary school (especially in the school entry phase) a focus on the letter-sound relationship and the development of vocabulary must be ensured.
The variety of text types, text modes and carrier media requires an in-depth teaching of reading strategies for orientation and research before reading, for organizing and developing while reading and for processing and reflecting on texts after reading.Reading strategies should be taught at every reading level and in every subject, with special attention being paid to the specific sign systems and technical languages ​​of the subject in question (e.g. mathematical information, scientific formulas).
Text strategies include activating prior knowledge; Clarify text structure based on content or formal categories; Depict text; Separate the essential from the insignificant; tap into unknown words; Ask questions to find specific information in the text.

Working creatively with texts ...:

A transfer of texts into other multimodal forms of expression (music, movement, implementation as a picture, picture story or comic, PowerPoint story, animation or cartoon, role play, film, radio play, theater, etc.) can help on the one hand, with linguistically less gifted and shy schoolgirls and to communicate with students via texts, on the other hand it promotes individual talents and personal text access. Creative reading that integrates current forms of literacy (e.g. Web 2.0 applications or the production of multimodal texts) encourages targeted, reflective and constructive media use.

Use age-appropriate media for children and young people ...:

Children's and youth literature or age-appropriate texts should be used in various media (books, newspapers, journals, magazines, comics, content in digital storage media and on the Internet) and various forms of communication (radio play, multimedia and interactive versions) of literature in all school types and levels Tobe offered.

Enabling critical and selective reception ...:

It is important to convey that reading takes place in dealing with a variety of media and that not only reading books leads to reading digital media, but also the other way around. It is essential that reading books and digital media requires different strategies and skills and should therefore be viewed as complementary. The book remains an important, personally enriching medium for deepening, contrasting and expanding. In addition, reading classes should promote the use of multimodal access and the use of the variety of analog and digital information technologies and media.
These texts should not only be recorded and understood in order to be able to use them in a targeted manner, but they must - even more so than conventional printed texts - be critically questioned with regard to their origin, their relevance and their intentions and the statements must be verified.

Books (as well as other media) motivate the discussion of social and cultural-political issues and contribute to the further development of the information and educational society. However, books may represent a certain hurdle for children from milieus unfamiliar with books. For the introduction to books on the one hand and to expand the reading of books on the other hand, there are multimodal approaches that are supported by digital information technologies and media.

The “embedded reading” approach enables the use of authentic occasions for reading and writing: the activities are part of higher-level tasks; This strategy is particularly recommended when students who are not reading-savvy are to be motivated to read and write because - unlike when reading a book - these tasks are not perceived as "reading" and "writing" at first glance.

When dealing with digital media, knowledge of how to promote critical skills when dealing with the World Wide Web and the consequences of networking through information and communication technologies is indispensable. Children and young people must be instructed to act appropriately, self-determined, creatively and socially responsible in a world that is heavily influenced by the media.

Integrate the multimedia school library into everyday teaching ...:

  • Reading, researching and researching are important in all subjects and in all types of schools or at all school levels. The establishment or inclusion of the central school library in all types of schools and school levels is essential for realizing the educational reading objectives.
  • The school library is a multimedia learning and information center in which various, relevant media are used in a networked manner. As a place for reading and communication, it makes an important contribution to methodological and didactic quality (project teaching, etc.) and creates framework conditions for the use of open forms of learning, for continuous preparation for the pre-scientific work or thesis as well as for individual reading. It is not only a place for acquiring knowledge, but a socio-cultural information and media center, a place where the fascination of reading can be experienced.
  • The school library enables all pupils to have access to media regardless of family resources and thus the opportunity to discover and try out the multimedia and multimodal variety of topics and texts.
  • The school library also provides books and other media in the pupils' native languages ​​(see book recommendations at www.schule-mehrsprachig.at (children's books in many languages).
  • The school library is a central place of learning, which creates the framework for research-based learning, for open forms of learning, interdisciplinary learning and project teaching and thus makes an important contribution to school quality. The school library is not only a place for acquiring knowledge, but also a place where reading can be experienced as a social and cultural practice. Its development and expansion is therefore given priority, with the involvement of all media.
  • The school library is to be used in all school types and levels as well as subjects in the classroom. In addition, it should offer the pupils opportunities and suggestions for individual reading and borrowing books and media.
  • Children's and young people's literature or age-appropriate texts should be used in various media (books, newspapers, journals, magazines, comics, digital storage media, Internet, etc.) and various forms of communication (radio play, multimedia and interactive translations of literature in the form of current digital display options such as selected films , Computer games, etc.) are offered in all school types and levels.
  • Regular use of the school library - in all types and levels of school as well as subjects taught - must be ensured, as is the possibility of individual use and borrowing and the use of digital media. It is the essence of the school library, in addition to the function accompanying the class, to give the pupils opportunities and suggestions for further reading and the use of all media.
  • The school library is an important resource for the continuous development of reading, research, method and information skills with regard to the pre-scientific work or diploma thesis within the school-leaving examinations or matriculation and diploma examinations. Highly motivated and well-trained school librarians who are in contact with colleagues from other schools and who take advantage of further training are indispensable for the quality work of a school library.

Recognize reading problems at an early stage, develop and apply individual support strategies:

Reading weaknesses are often the reason for poor performance and can have diverse and completely different (physiological, psychological and / or socially determined) causes, which usually occur independently of intelligence or diligence and which - provided they are recognized early and treated individually - often improved or can be eliminated.

For pupils with a first language other than German, it should be noted that acquiring the language of instruction takes about six years, even under the most favorable conditions, although the ability to communicate in German in everyday life is available earlier. It would be a mistake to suspect a reading disorder solely on the basis of the fact that the language acquisition process has not yet been completed.

In order to identify individual reading problems, the educators use diagnostic procedures (such as SLS, diagnostic checks) on the basis of which individual support strategies can be applied:

  • Funding strategies on a basic level (word and sentence level), e.g. in the practice of phonological, alphabetic and orthographic reading strategies and
  • Funding strategies at text level with the aim of controlling and monitoring one's own understanding of the text: these are, for example, repeated reading, summarizing text sections or the entire text (paraphrasing), finding if-then connections, formulating questions about the text , clarifying ambiguities, predicting the content of the following sections of text.

Pupils with poor reading skills are particularly well supported if they regularly read short texts (alternately read aloud) and discuss them with individual tutors. In the case of severe reading weaknesses, experts should be consulted (e.g. special teachers for reading and spelling weaknesses, school psychologists, DaZ teachers and native speaker teachers). Focussing on the letter-sound relationship is particularly suitable in primary school lessons for prevention or as a support measure for reading weaknesses. Reading partners and family literacy strategies have a positive influence on reading socialization.

Collaborate with reading and literature institutions, public and academic libraries and other network partners:

  • With regard to the support of individual reading biographies and lifelong reading, cooperation with libraries should be encouraged. Joint projects and coordinated planning of activities help to use libraries. A cooperation between the school library and the public library is a desirable goal (synergy effect).
  • The Austrian Youth Book Club, the Austrian Library, the organization "Buch.Zeit", the STUBE - study and advice center for children's and youth literature and the Austrian Youth Red Cross are to be mentioned as nationwide active educationally literate organizations in Austria.

There are also institutions in Germany and Switzerland that make excellent information and materials available online (e.g. Germany: Reading Foundation, Switzerland: Swiss Institute for Youth Literature. The websites www.lesepartnerinnen.at and www.eu-read provide an overview. com).

For all educators, the appropriate attitudes and skills must be developed in training, further training and further education, which enable them to take effective measures to promote reading:

  • Teachers have the necessary knowledge of diagnostic procedures and are able to offer evidence-based reading and spelling support; they have a basic knowledge of evaluation research.
  • Teachers have the basic knowledge necessary to promote reading (e.g. from the areas of linguistics, neurobiology, developmental psychology), they observe in a targeted manner and work together with school psychologists, they recognize deficits due to a lack of language skills.
  • Primary school teachers know about the importance of first reading lessons, they can promote basic learning processes and orient themselves to the reading book; They put sound-oriented methods before holistic methods and practice fluent reading with the students.
  • Teachers from the 5th grade onwards are able to build on this foundation and further develop meaningful reading; They can improve the students' reading comprehension (by thinking aloud about the text, formulating their own questions; summarizing sections, recognizing the main idea / context, especially if the information is not easily visible); They develop competencies in the students that enable them to compare “knowledge from the text” and “knowledge from outside the text”
  • Teachers practice knowledge-based comprehension skills with the students (drawing complex conclusions, justifying, interpreting, reflecting and evaluating, combining and interpreting).
  • Teachers offer structured support in reading comprehension (by providing
    e.g. explain terms).
  • Teachers aim to develop reading motivation (and know the relationship between continuous reading and increasing competence); they offer explicit training of fluids through reading tandems.
  • Teachers take the individual reading speed into account, they value accuracy and appropriate phrasing, they increase the level of automation in reading.
  • Teachers increasingly create reading opportunities in all subjects and implement the teaching principle of reading (also through the necessary cooperation).
  • Teachers arrange “reading occasions” in such a way that loud (aloud) reading also has a place; they do not exclude “bad” readers from reading aloud.
  • Teachers are able to strike a good balance between reading behavior and media consumption.
  • Teachers are qualified to work with parents and also reinforce it (with the help of the reading networks).
  • Teachers know about the effectiveness and benefits of family literacy and can thus also reach educationally disadvantaged population groups.
  • Teachers are able to create “reading plans” for the relevant course and to integrate them into school development plans or location-specific support concepts.
  • Teachers work closely with the remedial teacher and contribute to optimizing the allocation of remedial courses, both educationally and organizationally.

Vienna, June 10, 2013

The Federal Minister:
Dr. Claudia Schmied

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Last updated: May 7, 2018