Which colored light is moving faster

Colors are the language of the soul

History of color therapy

 

Color therapy is one of the oldest treatment methods. It was originally based on the healing properties of sunlight, which was used by many ancient cultures to alleviate various ailments. For this purpose, the Egyptians built color temples with seven rooms, each of which was held in a different color. Depending on which color the patient needed, he was brought to one of these rooms to take a healing color bath. The ancient Chinese also used colors for therapeutic purposes. For example, they painted intestinal patients with yellow and let the light penetrate into the room through yellow curtains. Epileptics put them on purple carpets and covered the windows with purple veils. They wrapped scarlet fever in red robes or took them to a room lined with red scarves.

Sir Isaak Newton (1642-1726) was an outstanding genius of his time. Best known for the foundation of the law of gravitation. But he also experimented with light and colors. He let white light flow through a prism. At the exit point, the light split into the seven spectral colors. So all colors are contained in bright light. With that he explained to us a breathtaking natural spectacle, the rainbow. The light breaks into millions of water droplets in the sky and we can marvel at the colorful wonder.

In 1810 the book "On the theory of colors" was published by none other than the poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832). He saw this as his life's work and thought it was even more meaningful than his literary writings. Goethe also dealt intensively with the effect of colors on the human psyche. He was one of the first to divide colors into primary and secondary colors, defining warm and cold colors.

Dr. med. Edwin Dwight Babbitt (1828-1905) was one of the first colored light therapists at the end of the 19th century. He developed a series of devices to convert sunlight into colored light and in 1878 published the extensive work “The Principles of Light and Color”. The healing successes achieved through his new treatment method gave color therapy great popularity at the time and aroused a wide range of interest in medicine.

Dinshah P. Ghadiali (1873-1966) came into contact with the possibilities of electricity at an early age. He was not only technically gifted, but also active in the field of medicine. When Dinshah was supposed to treat the seriously ill daughter of a business colleague, he remembered the work and successes of Babbitt, who would have resorted to irradiation with indigo-colored light in the event of such an illness. So Dinshah got himself a kerosene lamp as a light source, in front of which he attached an indigo-colored glass bottle. He used it to irradiate his young patient, who was visibly recovering under this therapy. That was the hour of birth of spectro-chromium therapy. This healing success never let Dinshah rest because he wanted to scientifically understand why simple colored light can show such a resounding success. So from then on he devoted himself to the development and research of colored light therapy, whereby the scientific approach was very important to him.

Professor Niels Ryberg Finsen (1860-1904) received the Nobel Prize for Medicine on December 10, 1903, in recognition of his contribution to the treatment of diseases with concentrated light radiation. With his research he laid the foundation for light therapy against tuberculosis, which was successfully carried out in the Alps. At the same time he proved that colors are independent forces and that specific color vibrations cause the human body as well as the psyche to react in certain ways.

Alexander Flemming (1881 - 1955) accidentally noticed on September 28, 1928 in the laboratory how molds of the genus Penicillium, which had got into one of his staphylococci cultures, had a growth-inhibiting effect on bacteria. Further research later led to the antibiotic penicillin. That was a great blessing for the time, and rightly so. Unfortunately, many naturopathic treatments, such as color light therapy, have been suppressed and have been forgotten. But a lot has happened in the last 100 years. Unfortunately, the antibiotic was often misused and found itself in our food chain. We are becoming more and more resistant to this medicine and the healing success lapses. Perhaps now is the time to remember the research into colors and light and their effects on body, mind and soul and to reintegrate them into the health sector.

The signs are good, because more and more people are becoming aware of how important colors and light are for their well-being and health and are using their healing powers in a targeted manner.

Alexander Flemming (1881 - 1955) accidentally noticed on September 28, 1928 in the laboratory how molds of the genus Penicillium, which had got into one of his staphylococci cultures, had a growth-inhibiting effect on bacteria. Further research later led to the antibiotic penicillin. That was a great blessing for the time, and rightly so. Unfortunately, many naturopathic treatments, such as color light therapy, have been suppressed and have been forgotten. But a lot has happened in the last 100 years. Unfortunately, the antibiotic was often misused and found itself in our food chain. We are becoming more and more resistant to this medicine and the healing success lapses. Perhaps now is the time to remember the research on colors and light and their effects on body, mind and soul and to reintegrate them into the health sector.

The signs are good, because more and more people are becoming aware of how important colors and light are for their wellbeing and health and are using their healing powers in a targeted manner.