What Unsaturated Fats Are Bad For You?

GOOD FATS, BAD FATS

Fat is a vital component for our body. It supplies the body with energy and has the highest energy density among the macronutrients with 9 kcal.

However, it is fat not just a supplier of energy, but also performs important functions in the body.

The fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K can only be absorbed by the body through the intake of fat.

Fat also serves as a Flavor carriers in food, warms our body through a layer of fat under the skin and protects the internal organs.

HOW MUCH FAT IS HEALTHY?

The daily fat requirement is based on the total calorie requirement and differs depending on gender, age, weight, activity level and outside temperature. Roughly, however, it can be said that 25 - 30% of the calorie requirement should or can be covered by fat.

Those who want to lose weight usually cut the fat from their diet. But the body depends on fat.
A distinction is made between them saturated and unsaturated fats.

Saturated fatty acids are considered to be harmful to health, while the unsaturated - especially the polyunsaturated fatty acids - have a health-promoting effect. So it depends on what fat we eat.

DO SATURATED FATS MAKE SICK?

Saturated fats are mostly found in animal products such as butter, cheese, cream, meat or sausage.

The so-called "hidden fats" in finished products also contain mainly saturated fats. Mostly, fats with a high proportion of saturated fatty acids have a firm consistency and a high melting point, such as coconut oil and palm oil.

Saturated fats supply though much energy, are but in excessunhealthy for our body. The fatty acids are stored in the cell membranes and thus slow down the metabolism.

They are also associated with increased inflammation and can promote diseases such as obesity, high blood pressure, higher cholesterol, hardening of the arteries, strokes and heart attacks.

TRANSFATS - POISON FOR THE BODY

The so-called trans-fatty acids are particularly dangerous, they are created during the industrial hardening of unsaturated fats and oils.

Hardened vegetable fats can be found in margarine, frying and baking fats or nut nougat cream. In addition, the poisonous trans fatty acids are also formed when oils are heated above the smoke point, as in fried foods such as chips and French fries. Trans fats raise the level of LDL cholesterol (the “bad” cholesterol) and lower the level of HDL cholesterol (the “good” cholesterol) in the blood.

The consequences are increased cholesterol levels, arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases.

The proportion of trans fats should make up a maximum of 1% of the total energy intake, the average in Germany is currently 4%.

Preferably less fried foods eat or at least avoid the snack bar if it smells of old fat there. Also make sure that the temperature is correct when cooking with oil! Foods labeled “vegetable fats, partially hydrogenated” also indicate trans fats.

ARE UNSATURATED FATS GOOD FOR MY BODY?

Unsaturated fats are in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids differentiated. To understand: Fatty acids consist of chains of different lengths of carbon atoms, to which hydrogen atoms are then attached. With monounsaturated fats there is a double bond between the carbon atoms, with polyunsaturated fats two or more double bonds.

Unsaturated fatty acids lower the harmful LDL and increase the good HDL cholesterol, the blood fat level decreases and the blood vessels are not clogged. On average, however, we do not consume enough unsaturated fatty acids, so it is best to replace some of the saturated fats with unsaturated fats. The unsaturated fatty acids can usually be recognized by the fact that they are liquid at room temperature and have a low melting point.

Our body is able to produce monounsaturated fatty acids itself, so they are not essential. Olive oil, rapeseed oil, avocados and nuts are particularly rich in monounsaturated fatty acids.

Most of the unsaturated fats cannot be produced by our bodies and therefore have to be taken in with food. These so-called essential fatty acids differ in Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acidssome of which are vital. They protect the body from rheumatic diseases, have anti-inflammatory effects, lower cholesterol and blood lipid levels and prevent deposits in the blood vessels. Some polyunsaturated fatty acids are vital for the body.

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MORE OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS FOR OUR BODY

In Germany there is an undersupply of omega-3 fatty acids, while we consume too much of omega-6 fatty acids. A is recommended Ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids of 1: 4.

In fact, the consumption is 1:15. Therefore, make sure that you consume a sufficient amount of omega-3 fatty acids and reduce your consumption of omega-6 fatty acids.

Good sources of omega-3 are canola, walnut and linseed oils, as well as high-fat fish such as herring, mackerel and salmon.

The German Nutrition Society (DGE) recommends covering 0.5% of the total energy intake with omega-3 as a reference value. This corresponds roughly to 1 - 1.5 tablespoons of rapeseed oil. In addition, a supplementation with so-called fish oil capsules is recommended.

Omega-6 fatty acids are mainly found in sunflower, safflower and corn oils. These oils should be avoided and replaced with rapeseed or linseed oil.

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