Can prostatitis really be cured

Abacterial prostatitis

What is Abacterial Prostatitis?

Abacterial prostatitis is a condition in which there is persistent pain in the area around the prostate. This condition is sometimes referred to as chronic (long-term) prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Although it is called prostatitis, it is unclear whether the prostate is actually causing the pain.

The prostate is a walnut-shaped gland that sits tightly under the bladder in men. The exact cause of this condition is not known. A bacterial infection can, however, be ruled out as the cause. It is most common in older men with an enlarged prostate.

General complaints are:

  • Pain in the area between the scrotum and anus,
  • Pain when ejaculating and
  • occasionally blood in the urine or semen.

The respective treatment includes Medication to relieve pain, to Relaxation of the muscles of the prostate and often antibiotics as well. Abacterial prostatitis can be difficult to treat and many sufferers can only partially control symptoms, even after several attempts at therapy.

Another name for abacterial prostatitis: inflammation of the prostate.

Causes and Risks of Prostate Inflammation

The prostate is a walnut-shaped gland that sits under the bladder and forms the first part of the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the bladder). Although persistent pain in this area is known as prostatitis, it is unclear whether the prostate is actually causing it. The exact cause of the pain is unknown.

In some cases, there may be inflammation in this area for no particular reason, while in other cases the pain comes from the muscles or nerves in that area. Abacterial prostatitis is most common in older men with an enlarged prostate or in men with other diseases such as fibromyalgia or irritable bowel syndrome.

What are the symptoms of abacterial prostatitis?

The most common symptom are Pain in the perineal area, the area between the scrotum (the muscle sac where the testicles are located) and the anus. There may also be lower back pain.

Other complaints are pain:

  • while ejaculating,
  • when defecating or
  • when urinating.

Blood can be seen in the urine or semen. Some men urinate more frequently or have poor urine streams.

An occasional symptom of this condition is erectile dysfunction. All of these symptoms can be associated with a cloudy mood.

If you are unsure whether these symptoms apply to you, start a symptom analysis.

Investigation and diagnosis

Diagnosis is usually made by an experienced doctor or urologist (urinary tract specialist) based on symptoms and a prostate exam. To diagnose abacterial prostatitis, rule out other possible causes of the symptoms. This sometimes requires urine, sperm and blood tests. In some cases, an ultrasound scan of the prostate or a CT scan of the abdomen may be required.

How is prostatitis treated?

The respective treatment includes Medication to relieve pain, to relax the muscles of the prostate and often antibiotics. For many affected people, the symptoms can also be alleviated by not sitting for so long.

Relaxed trainingwhich does not put too much strain on the pelvic floor can also be helpful. For some people, acupuncture is beneficial. Besides, the emotional and psychological support very important to help those affected deal with their symptoms. Advice can be helpful. Surgical removal of the prostate may be an option in older men, but it can lead to erectile dysfunction.

What's the prognosis?

Treating abacterial prostatitis is difficult and can be frustrating. Many sufferers can only partially control the symptoms, even after several attempts at therapy. In these cases, ongoing, reliable emotional support is important.