What do Trump supporters think of Canada?

Donald Trump and Ted Cruz like each other. The two Republicans keep calling each other "my friend" and not saying bad things about the other in public. Cruz, many think, is not criticizing the controversial businessman because the Texas Senator is hoping Trump supporters will overflow with him if their idol breaks the polls.

That hasn't happened even after six months: the 69-year-old billionaire is in first or second place in almost all states. In Iowa, where the first area code takes place on February 1, Cruz is ahead: the hardliner is well received by many conservative Christians. And because Trump always emphasizes that there is no room for defeat in his life, he doesn't like it at all. So Trump attacked the upstart indirectly: For days he has been talking about Cruz was born in Canada and may not be able to become US president.

Of course, Trump is innocent and allegedly only warns of "problems" for them Grand Old Party in general and "my friend" Cruz in particular. "I say, as a Republican, 'Ted, it's very important that you fix this'." Trump would not be Trump if he knew how: Cruz should by declaratory action (declaratory judgment) clarify that he is really entitled to move into the White House.

Barack Obama, the man who was the first to annoy Trump with questions about his citizenship, still lives there. The billionaire is the best-known "birther": This is how those Americans - mostly white and conservative - were called who refused to believe that Obama was born in Hawaii and is therefore a US citizen. Even after the White House posted the birth certificate online in 2009, many Republicans believed Obama was a Muslim from Africa. Trump himself promised Obama five million dollars in 2012, which he wanted to donate if the president made his university degrees public.

Ted Cruz, who studied law at Harvard University like Obama, first tried to ironically clear the "non-issue" by posting a clip from the 1970s series on Twitter Happy Days posted.

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But because the US media have to report something constantly and Trump continues to talk about Cruz's birthplace in Canada during his appearances and the Democrat Alan Grayson has already announced a lawsuit if Cruz is nominated as a candidate, the Texan has to speak up again and again . He stresses that he gave up his Canadian citizenship in 2014 - and has the conservative website Breitbart News provided his mother Eleanor's birth certificate.

While some constitutional lawyers consider Cruz's eligibility for the highest office to be "unclear" (details here), the Texan argues that he could become US president as the son of an American. Cruz refers to John McCain, who succumbed to Obama in 2008 and was born in Panama. He considers the "birther" discussion about Cruz to be "completely legitimate". The Senator from Arizona should be happy to throw a stick between Cruz's legs: Many colleagues consider the Texan to be a ruthless self-promoter who has been railing against the Obamacare health reform for 21 hours straight.

Obama Spokesperson: It would be ironic if Cruz were to run

For Ted Cruz it has long been clear that his alleged friend Donald is putting him under a lot of pressure here. His rivals have been making malicious remarks for days, and Obama's spokesman Josh Earnest has also said that it would be "quite ironic" if, "after seven years of drama" surrounding the US President's birth certificate, the Republican base nominated the candidate who didn't was born in the USA.

Cruz's Canadian birthplace will continue to be the subject of discussion until the next TV debate this Thursday. The audience can be curious whether Trump and Cruz will continue to present themselves as friends on this occasion.

Meanwhile, "The Donald" has thought about something to stir up the talk about his rival's "non-American origins": Like him Weekly Standard reports, the song "Born in the USA" by Bruce Springsteen is booming from the loudspeakers during his election campaign appearances.

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